Throw Tea into the Sea

During my last visit to New England, The Tall Man and I ventured down to Boston before my flight out to do a little touristing! We opted to check out the Boston Tea Party Ships and Museum, which is absolutely perfect for any history lover.

Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum | Boston, MA

The museum recommends purchasing tickets in advance, but we had no trouble getting into one of the shows.

Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum | Boston, MA

You start off the experience in a town hall type setting the night before the famous tea party. After taking on the identity of someone who participated in the Boston Tea Party, “Sam Adams” provides a compelling speech to teach you about the events that led up to the decision to destroy the tea and why this event had to take place the night of December 16, 1773.

Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum | Boston, MA Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum | Boston, MA

After shouts of “Huzzah!” and donning your secret identity, you head out to one of the two ships docked in the harbor. The museum features two replica ships of the period, the Eleanor and the Beaver.

Once on board, not only do you learn about the destruction of the 340 chests of British East India Company Tea, which weighed over 92,000 pounds, but you also get to see what living conditions were like onboard these vessels that brought trade items into the colonies. Let’s just say, you had to really love your fellow sailors as living conditions were tight!

You also get the chance to throw tea into the sea just like the Sons of Liberty.

After exiting the boat, you enter the museum for a multi-sensory experience where you get to see what exactly occurred in the days and weeks following the tea party. Unfortunately, photography is not allowed but trust me it is a very cool museum! One of our favorite parts of the museum was getting to see and learn about the Robinson Half Chest, one of only two known tea chests from the event that is known to exist.

So, if you are looking for a place to start your Boston visit we definitely recommend starting here — where the American Revolution started.

Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum | Boston, MA

What is your favorite museum in Boston?

Gateway to Maine {York, ME}

Weekend before last I flew up to New England to spend some quality time with The Tall Man before he moves to North Carolina this week. (Insert happy dance here!) During my visit, we decided to add another state to our state date list, and took a road trip to Maine!

We spent Saturday in York. It is exactly what you would think when you think of very quintessential Maine. The Tall Man and I drove to Portsmouth and then followed the highway along the coast. The weather was absolutely perfect for a windows-down drive to soak in the salt air. We arrived to Cape Neddick a little before lunch time. We drove up and saw Nubble Lighthouse, but, unfortunately, we I was not prepared for the significant temperature drop so we didn’t spend much time walking around the town.

Nubble Lighthouse | York, ME Nubble Lighthouse | York, ME

Instead,  we drove over to York Harbor for lunch at the Ship’s Cellar Pub in the basement of York Harbor Inn. My parents recommended this restaurant after their last trip up to New England. After a delicious lunch of lobster (a must!) we headed down to the beach for a quick walk. Unfortunately, the weather was not cooperating, so we drove around for a bit before heading back over the state line.

I would love to head back to the York Region and Maine for another visit when the weather is a little better!

What are your favorite places in Maine?

A Letter to 17-Year-Old Caitlin

Dear 17-year-old Caitlin,

It’s me, well you, 10 years from now. I know you have heard this before, but you are about to embark on the greatest journey of your life. College. But before we can do this, we have to cross that stage and become a Walton Raider alumna. Whoopee! My only advice is to be careful with the stairs. They can trip us up from time to time.

WHS 2006 Graduation

The next 10 years are going to be some of the best years of your life as well as the most challenging. We come out on the other end as a stronger woman than when we left the hallowed halls of Walton. So here is my advice to survive what’s coming down the road:

Say yes to adventures.

College is a time to explore and find yourself. Try to break out of your comfort zone a little … I promise it’s worth it. Do not miss a single opportunity to have fun.

I’d only skip the spring break trip to New Orleans your sophomore year, it’s not worth it. I promise you’ll get another opportunity to explore NOLA.

Be yourself.

You are pretty awesome. The sooner you learn it the better. It took us a long time to figure it out, but once we learned that lesson life become more enjoyable.

Watch out for boys who don’t treat you well.

You get to date, no worries. There will be some great guys and there will be some not-so-great guys. Avoid the not-so-great guys. Listen to your family and friends and get out of those relationships. Stand up for yourself, and know they aren’t the right guy for you.

Know that it’s completely okay to be a hermit.

You are a textbook-definition of an extroverted introvert. Don’t worry what all the haters say; be proud of your introverted self! But do go out on occasion with your friends, because those are the nights you’ll remember after you graduate college — not the ones with your nose buried in a book.

Go to football games (all of them) and don’t skip class.

I know I don’t have to tell you this, but just making sure that base is covered! You meet some of your favorite people in your college and graduate classes, and football Saturdays in Tuscaloosa are the greatest thing on this planet. Roll Tide! Study before hand and go tailgate on the quad.

Know that the best is yet to come.

You’re going to fall in love, get your heart broken, travel, change your mind about a dozen times about what you want to do after you graduate, and sometimes feel so lost you want to give up (go to Mom at that point … she has the right answers). There will be so many good times in the years to come, and we will get through it and it will all be worth it. I promise.

Love,
27-year-old Caitlin

Historic Banning Mills

An hour west of Atlanta is the world’s longest zip line, Screaming Eagle. Surrounded by 300 beautifully wooded acres, Historic Banning Mills offers visitors an adventure resort. The facility offers multiple levels of ziplining courses, high and low ropes courses, Guinness World Record climbing wall, nature trails and more.

I surprised my adventure loving boyfriend with a day at Banning Mills to celebrate his birthday. I opted for us to participate in the Extreme Tour. This provided us the opportunity to fly through and over the treetops with around 24 ziplines and to traverse 20 sky bridges. This tour included the Sky Trek Bridge that is 600 feet long and 190 feet high over the gorge, and Screaming Eagle, which is like stepping off a 30-story building. If you are going to do an adventure course, I highly recommend this tour!

Historic Banning Mills | Banning, GA

That little dot on the bridge is me. I will say despite being terrifying (for me) the view of Snake River from the sky bridges is absolutely beautiful!

The Tall Man has already asked if we can go back to take part in their ropes courses.

In addition to the ziplining adventure, I also surprised The Tall Man by renting one of the tree house rooms for the night and ordered us dinner at the lodge. It was absolutely worth it! If you get the chance, I highly recommend dining at Banning Mills! The food was absolutely fantastic, and the atmosphere was quite intimate. The room itself was perfectly cozy, and had all the amenities of a hotel…but it was in a tree! Plus the view from the porch makes the perfect setting for sipping your hot beverage of choice before heading to breakfast in the lodge.

Next time you are looking for an adventure be sure to add Historic Banning Mills to your list!

What’s your favorite high adventure activity?

May the Force be with you.

Star Wars has been impacting viewers since it came out in 1977. We have all fallen in love with R2D2, Yoda, Chewbacca, Luke, Leia and Hans. But have you ever thought of the costumes as a character by itself? “Star Wars and the Power of Costume: The Exhibition” is the place where you can experience the costumes, see where the designs came from, and George Lucas’ intention with each costume. Plus – the items you see are the actual costumes worn in the films, not re-creations. Very exciting stuff.

Star Wars Exhibit

The Tall Man and I had a chance to visit this exhibit during our weekend getaway in New York City, and it was one of our favorite parts of the trip. We both totally geeked out as we wandered around the exhibit. If you have a serious Star Wars fan in your life, this is the exhibit for them! Take a stroll through this fun exhibit with me.

Star Wars and the Power of Costume: The Exhibition

Which Star Wars character is your favorite?

“Star Wars and the Power of Costume: The Exhibition” runs Saturday through September 5, 2016 at Discovery Times Square. From New York, the exhibit is headed to Denver Museum of Art until Apr. 2, 2017.

#TTownNeverDown

Five years. 1, 462 days. 35,088 hours. 2,105,280 minutes.

#TTownNeverDown

Some times it feels like April 27, 2011 was a lifetime ago, and there are other times when it feels like it just occurred. If you grow up in Alabama, every spring the one sound you hear frequently, unfortunately, is that of tornado sirens screeching through the still air.

We had been warned that April 27th would not be like any other day. Tornadoes are frequent in Alabama in April, in fact not 12 days before one had passed through the south side of the city. But on this day, the conditions were just right for a super tornado outbreak. It was the week before finals during my first year MBA. I was anxious to attend those last classes to gain that one last piece of information that would help me pass my finals. In the early morning hours, the city of Tuscaloosa was awoken by massive thunder storms and sirens, and we would later realize was the start of this infamous day. I moved through my day like any other only paying closer attention to the radar during my spare minutes of studying and with James Spann talking in the background.

Waiting for my night class to start, my best friend called me from Montgomery and told me to head to campus for cover. She said a super cell containing a tornado was heading for Tuscaloosa. I grabbed my books, computer and ran to campus. I called my brother on the way and told him to not mess around; this was going to be the storm to beat all storms.

As I made it to the MBA Lounge in the basement of Bidgood Hall, there were other students hanging out and studying. I started up my computer, found the radar, turned on the TV to James Spann, and watched as the tornado crossed into Tuscaloosa County. We watched helpless as it moved towards us. We moved across the hall to get away from windows unsure where the storm was going to strike in the city. We watched on my laptop (thanks to internet being one of the items on the generator) as James Spann reported on the storm tearing through the city trying our best to figure out the path based on landmarks mentioned. It only took minutes for it leave our city, and it when it was over we had no clue what was left. As we quietly left the building, the only thing we noticed was broken branches lying on the Quad and the sound of sirens in the distance. There is nothing as helpless a sound as when all the fire trucks, ambulances, and police cars in your city converge to an area a mile away from you.

It took several attempts to get in touch with my parents to tell them I was safe. And that’s when I heard the rumor that Central High School was gone. That was a little over a mile away, and all I knew was my brother was in the apartments behind it. I told my parents what I had heard, and I sat on the steps of my building calling my brother repeatedly until he picked up. It felt like a lifetime, but in fact was about 30 minutes. He was safe.

The hours that followed were a blur. My friends checked for me that my apartment was standing and my car was safe. Those of us in the Lounge went to the grocery store down the street for beer and food. Our dinner that night consisted of chips and Bud Light. We sat in the halls of Bidgood unable to process what had just occurred. My apartment had no water or power, so instead my friend, Rachel, and I slept on the couches in the Lounge. The next morning I stepped out to survey the carnage for the first time ever. I walked the couple of blocks to 15th Street, and the only thing I remember is the smell. The smell of wet, splintered wood and severed gas lines produces a distinctive odor that stands apart from any other smell I had ever encountered.

Not really being able to function in my apartment, I packed a small bag and headed to stay with my Tuscaloosa family. In the days that followed, I’d get up early and head to Emergency Serves on 15th Street to distribute food and go through all the donations. And in that metal warehouse, I saw first hand the outpouring of love and support. It was in little things like someone driving the 45 minutes from Birmingham with a hundred Krispy Kreme doughnuts. It was running into Home Depot to buy tarps for friends and realizing that the gentleman helping me was from Tennessee. It was strangers driving from all over to lend a helping hand in clearing debris.

The hands and feet of Jesus were alive and well in the days, weeks and months that followed April 27, 2011. The people who came may forget that this tornado outbreak ever occurred, but I can tell you their presence was a healing balm on our wide open wounds. The state still has its scar marks in the landscape, and the its people even more. But Alabamians are resilient, and we never let something like this get us down. We come back stronger than ever, and even though Tuscaloosa will never be the same again it is very much alive and beating. #TTownNeverDown

ATX {Austin, TX}

This past weekend I flew out to Austin, Texas for my second National Geographic Expeditions trip. It was my first visit to the Live Music Capital of the World and I had an absolute blast exploring the city with my new friends and workshop buddies.

Welcome to Austin, TX

I flew out Wednesday night after work so I could have the whole day Thursday exploring before the workshop started on Thursday night. My friend Dave also joined me on the trip, so in his bright yellow Wrangler we toured all Austin had to offer. One of our first goals was to find as many murals and pieces of wall art as possible. With the help of a Pinterest  we were able to find quite a number of them. I highly recommend this little excursion during your visit. It provides a great opportunity to see a lot of the city and you get a great perspective of how Austin acquired the tag line “Keep Austin Weird”.

Our assignment throughout the weekend with the workshop was to create a sense of place. The first location for our field assignments was the Texas Capitol building. They say everything is bigger in Texas and this includes the capitol building. Construction started in 1882 and it is the largest state capitol building in the US. The central dome was my favorite part, as well as all the original fixtures in the House and Senate.

Texas State Capitol | Austin, TX

It is truly a spectacular piece of architecture.

To keep with our theme of creating a sense of place, our little group also walked around Lady Bird Lake in the morning light to practice our motion with the runners, bikers and rowers. We then moved to the local farmers market.

In addition to wandering all over Austin, we indulged in some seriously good food. I highly recommend Jo’s Coffee, Royal Blue GroceryManuel’sBotticellis and Ruby’s BBQ.

Ever traveled to Austin, what’s your favorite part?

WELCOME TO NEW YORK!

Home to the Empire State Building, Times Square, Statue of Liberty, The Big Apple is consistently one of the top 10 US tourist destinations.

When a work trip presented me with an opportunity to tack on a three-day weekend I took it. The Tall Man and I spent two solid days playing mega tourists and checking off our NYC bucket list: Times Square, the Empire State Building, New York Public Library, Statue of Liberty, 9/11 Memorial, Brooklyn Bridge, Central Park and more.

Our flights arrived into LaGuardia at 11:00 am on Friday, so we grabbed a cab, checked into our hotel and embarked on our first adventure. Prior to arriving in New York, we decided we would see the Vikings exhibit and the Star Wars exhibit at Discovery Times Square per recommendation of one of my coworkers. Our first exhibit was the Vikings exhibit. If you are a fan of the show, Vikings, or just the Norse culture then we recommend checking this exhibit out. It is very informative and has a ton of awesome artifacts.

From Discover Times Square we decided it was time for a late lunch. The Tall Man selected Virgil’s Barbecue. (I’m looking forward to introducing my man to some real southern barbecue the next time he comes to Atlanta.) After lunch, we wandered around Times Square for a bit before venturing onto the New York Public Library, which opened its doors on May 23, 1911. We were completely blown away by the intricate details inside the building and the architecture in general. I would totally go to my public library more if it looked like this building.

On Friday night, we headed to one of the most iconic buildings in New York—the Empire State Building. Construction on this massive yet beautiful structure finished on April 11, 1931, and it once held the title of tallest building in New York for 70 years. After purchasing tickets, you ride the elevator to the 60th floor where you can stroll through the small exhibit and the gift shop before riding the elevator to the 68th Floor Observation Deck. Take a second and walk through the exhibit. It’s pretty amazing the expense, time and expertise that went into building this iconic building. Lucky for us, the night was clear and we could see all the lights of New York.

We started our Saturday morning off with a lovely stroll down 5th Avenue to Central Park. One of our stops along 5th Avenue was Saint Patrick’s Cathedral, which was completed in 1878. It is a spectacular piece of architecture. After reaching Central Park, we looped back to Times Square for the Star Wars Exhibit, which was is a very cool exhibit. Following the Star Wars exhibit, we explored Times Square a little more. We spent the rest of the afternoon strolling the streets of New York before enjoying a delicious dinner at Madison & Vine near our hotel followed by a delectable chocolate mousse at Benjamin Steakhouse.

The Plaza Hotel | New York City

Sunday morning we caught a cab and headed down to Lower Manhatten. We started with the 9/11 Memorial and a viewing of the Freedom Tower. We then proceeded to cross the Brooklyn Bridge. If you are looking for spectacular views of Manhatten, I suggest you take this hike—it is totally worth it in our opinion. Plus the bridge in and of itself is a pretty spectacular piece of work. Completed in 1883, the Brooklyn Bridge is one of the oldest hybrid cable-stayed/suspension bridges in the United States. The Brooklyn Bridge also holds a special place for The Tall Man and myself since we crossed one of Roebling’s bridges in Cincinnati on our first date.

Once in Brooklyn, we headed to One Girl Cookies for a small treat and hot chocolate before heading back to Manhattan. Once back in Manhattan, we grabbed our New York Harbor tickets to see the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island. Dedicated on October 28, 1886, Statue of Liberty has stood guard of the New York Harbor and welcomed immigrants during Ellis Island’s operations.

That evening, we walked back down to Central Park for a stroll in the snow flurries. Central Park was established in 1857, and today it is an 843 acres park in middle-upper Manhattan area. It was surprising to me how this space makes you forget you are surrounded by a concrete jungle, your only reminder is the honking of passing cars.

Central Park | New York City

Have you ever been to New York City? What is on your New York City bucket list?

World of Coca-Cola

The World of Coca-Cola is the only place where you can experience the fascinating story of the world’s best-known beverage brand, and it is located in the heart of downtown Atlanta.

World of Coca-Cola | Atlanta, GA

I recommend starting with the Vault of the Secret Formula exhibit. Through this multi-media exhibit, you can view not only the vault where the secret formula is stored but also 125 years of history, special moments and memories of this classic beverage. I particularly liked trying my hand at the Virtual Taste Maker to see if I could duplicate THE secret formula. I failed.

Coca-Cola has touched millions of lives. In the Milestones of Refreshment exhibit, navigate your way through Coke’s history. This exhibit is composed of ten galleries and a thousand of original artifacts, some dating back to the earliest days of the beverage’s history.

In Bottle Works, you get a behind the scenes look at an operating Coca-Cola bottling process. Bottle Works showcases some of the same equipment and processes that are found in a full-size bottling plant. You even get a complimentary commemorative bottle as you are leaving the World of Coca-Cola.

Your last stop is the Taste It! room. Here you can try 100 different beverages from five different regions around the world. Beverly from Italy is a fun one to try! But we really liked Inca Cola from Peru and another from Africa.

Last not least, be sure to grab a picture with the Coca-Cola Polar Bear!

World of Coca-Cola | Atlanta, GA

Open Happiness, and visit World of Coca-Cola next time you are in Atlanta.

What is your favorite Coca-Cola product?